SPECIES IDENTIFICATION - GET TO KNOW YOUR FISH!

 
 

FISHING THE FLORIDA GULF WATERS IS SECOND TO NONE!

SNOOK

THE COMMON SNOOK

There are five different species of snook that inhabit Florida waters: Common Snook, Small-Scale Fat Snook, Large-Scale Fat Snook, Swordspine Snook, and Tarpon Snook.

SCIENTIFIC NAME:  "Centropomus Undecimalis"

APPEARANCE:  Coloration of the Common Snook is golden yellow and pale yellow pelvic fins. Common snook have a slender body and a distinct lateral line. The dorsal fins are high and divided and the anal spines are relatively short. The common snook has a sloping forehead with a large mouth and a protruding lower jaw.

HABITAT:  Adult Common Snook inhabit many environments including mangrove forests, beaches, river mouths, near shore reefs, salt marshes and sea grass meadows. Common Snook are found in water temperatures between 43 F and 53 F .Common snook are abundant along the Atlantic coast of Florida from Cape Canaveral south through the Keys and Dry Tortugas, and north to Cedar Key on the gulf coast. Common snook occur infrequently along the coast of Texas to Galveston and then more or less continuously south to Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

BEHAVIOR:  Snook are known as "ambush feeders" meaning that they'll surprise attack their prey as it swims or moves into range. This occurs especially at the mouths of inlets where currents play a role while the snook waits in hiding behind bridge pilings, rocks, or other submerged structures.

SIZE:  Females are larger than the males and can grow to 4 feet in length and reach 50 pounds. Most angler caught Common Snook are between 18 inches and 30 inches and weigh 5 to 8 pounds.

FLORIDA STATE RECORD:  44 lb, 3 oz, Ft. Myers:  Robert De Cosmo, 4/25/1984

EATING HABITS:  Snook are known as "ambush feeders" meaning that they'll surprise attack their prey as it swims or moves into range. This occurs especially at the mouths of inlets where currents play a role while the snook waits in hiding behind bridge pilings, rocks, or other submerged structures.

Besides preying on small fish, snook also feed on shrimp, crabs, and mollusks.

FACTS:  Snook are protandric hermaphrodites and change sex from male to female. The actual cause of the change is not known, but current research may provide an answer.

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